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Australia’s Health Requirements for Visa Applicants

Australia is serious about keeping their country as strong and healthy as possible. Healthy citizens mean less of a drain on state coffers and allow a government to invest that money into unavoidable expenses such as education and infrastructure.

Australia’S Health Requirements For Visa Applicants

People with communicable disease stand a good chance of spreading the disease making citizens ill affecting the labour force and state spending to treat the disease and limit the spreading thereof.

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TB is one such disease dreaded disease and it seems Australia is managing the spreading thereof among its general population extremely well. In 2015 only 6 cases per 100 000 citizens were being treated. Compare this to more than 850 cases per 100 000 citizens in South Africa.

It is then no surprise that when you apply for an Australian visa, you may need to do a health examination and submit proof of the findings of any tests. Australia requires any person entering the country to be free from diseases or conditions that may be dangerous to the Australian community. What you need to do will be different depending on your personal circumstances – including your age, where you’ve travelled, and which visa you’re applying for.

An overview of Australia’s Health Requirement when Applying for a Visa

The purpose of the health requirement is to:

• protect the Australian community from public health and safety risks, particularly active tuberculosis
• contain public expenditure on health and community services, including social security benefits, allowances and pensions
• safeguard the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to health care and community services in short supply.

Most visa applicants, and in some circumstances their dependents (whether they are migrating to Australia or not), are required to meet the health requirement.

To meet the health requirement you must be free from a disease or condition that is:

• considered to be a threat to public health or a danger to the Australian community
• likely to result in significant health care and community service costs to the Australian community
• likely to require health care and community services that would limit the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to those services as they are already in short supply. We refer to this as 'prejudice to access'. For more information, see significant costs and services in short supply.

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In some circumstances to meet the health requirement you may be asked to sign a Health Undertaking by a Medical Officer of the Commonwealth.

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